• Our Thing

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    Till today we both moved to Canada my daughter speak mother language Mandarin, second language English, and last few days I try start to talk with my daughter Shanghai language. She’s excited to know it. Continue reading “Our Thing”

  • Keeping Language

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    I got married when I was eighteen and me and my husband had four girls. But my husband went to residential school. So there was two people with two different lifestyles. The way he wanted to bring my girls up and the way I wanted to bring my girls up, it was a struggle because in school our language was beaten out of him. But for some reason my husband kept his language. And I said “how did you do that” Continue reading “Keeping Language”

  • Crown Land

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    When I was very little we lived in between two reserves, Kulleet Bay and Shell Beach. And the reason we lived in between two reserves, and it was a reserve at one time where we lived, was because my grandmother was married to the son of Prime Minister John Abbott and he gave them that land as Crown land to live on. However, when I was growing up, I always disputed it and said that’s not so, but with the treaty, I found out that was really so. I always felt it was always our land, and I guess it was always our land, but it also belonged to everyone else as well and the people that surrounded us.

  • Moving Down That Path

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    I think the story that I’m going to talk about today is a story that led me down my path of reconciliation. I was invited up to VIU (Vancouver Island University) to listen to reconciliation stories, and during that event I heard three people talk about their experiences with residential schools. That really changed, changed me, changed the way I thought about things. Continue reading “Moving Down That Path”

  • Pay A Visit

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    The first contact that I could think of came through my father. He was a business administrator for school boards. And he used to have to go to meetings. Continue reading “Pay A Visit”

  • Contact with My Children

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    I went a few years without contact with my children, who were in foster care. They were apprehended when my son was nine months old and my daughters when they were about five and six years old. Continue reading “Contact with My Children”

  • Helper

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    My family moved to the Cowichan territory when I was about thirteen. And that kind of bubbled up as soon as I read the Contact No Contact, and the Cowichan, of course, territory and lands. My middle school was mixed with quite a diverse cultures. There was the south Asians, First Nations and then all us white settlers. And I could feel a conflict as soon as I got into that school. Continue reading “Helper”

  • Naming

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    In the next month or two, our family is going to be doing a naming. There are seven grandkids that will be doing a Coast Salish naming and be receiving our traditional names from our family. So what’s really neat about that is learning about who our ancestors are even more in depth, and how amazing it is that we have that sacred knowledge around who those people are, and how our lineage works, and the gift that comes with that name, and the honour that comes with that name. Continue reading “Naming”

  • Reef Whale

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    I went on a 30 to 45 minute boat ride to Ahousaht, in Tofino, with my brother, my auntie and a whole bunch of other people to meet my family for the first time. Continue reading “Reef Whale”

  • First Memory

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    Looking back now, I realized that my first contact with anyone who is of First Nations’ descent was a little girl called Debbie Continue reading “First Memory”